High-quality child care produces a stimulating, secure and loving atmosphere for the little one.

Focusing on children's wellbeing and ecological exposures in child care centers is Essential for several reasons: Since they display exploratory behaviors that put them in direct contact with contaminated surfaces, they're more likely to be vulnerable to some contaminants found. They're also less developed immunologically, physiologically, and neurologically and are more prone to the negative effects of toxins and chemicals. Children spend a whole lot of time in child care settings. Many babies and young children spend as many as 50 hours each week, in child care.

Nationally, 13 million children, or 65 percent of U.S. kids, spend some part of the afternoon in child care and at California alone, roughly 1.1 million children five decades or younger attend child care. In this exact same condition, many adults might also be subjected as roughly 146,000 employees work 40 hours or more a week child care centers. Child care environments include substances which may be harmful for kids. Recent studies suggest that lots of child care environments might contain pesticides, allergens, volatile organic compounds from cleaning agents and sanitizers, and other contaminants which may be toxic to children's wellbeing.

Nevertheless, little is understood about what environmental and chemical exposures they might be getting in these configurations. To fill this gap, we quantified. Outcomes of the study were reported on the California Air Resources Board. Our findings help inform policies to lower accidents to children, encourage training and workshops to educate child care providers about methods to lower children's environmental exposures (ex. Using integrated pest management to decrease pesticide usage ), and search for future research.

Washing Your Baby’s Clothes
Washing Your Baby’s Clothes
Washing Your Baby’s Clothes – How to do it Rightly
Washing Dishes
Washing Dishes
Cleaning up after oneself is an important life skill
Make a Bed
Make a Bed
It might be a dying art, but learning how to make a bed is a valuable skill.
Sweep a Floor
Sweep a Floor
Give a kid a broom, and you are likely to see dirt flipping everywhere except in a pile.
Mop a Floor
Mop a Floor
Be sure to give them instructions on how to mop different floor types you may have in your home.

Is Sparkling Water Good For Kids? Get The Facts!

La Croix

Is it okay for kids to drink sparkling water? Is it bad for teeth? Is it hydrating? Get the facts about fizzy water here. For kids who don’t love plain water and parents who aren’t fans of soda, sparkling water can feel like a good compromise.  But if you’ve wondered whether it’s okay for them...

The post Is Sparkling Water Good For Kids? Get The Facts! appeared first on Real Mom Nutrition.


La Croix

Is it okay for kids to drink sparkling water? Is it bad for teeth? Is it hydrating? Get the facts about fizzy water here. For kids who don’t love plain water and parents who aren’t fans of soda, sparkling water can feel like a good compromise.  But if you’ve wondered whether it’s okay for them...

The post Is Sparkling Water Good For Kids? Get The Facts! appeared first on Real Mom Nutrition.

La Croix

Is it okay for kids to drink sparkling water? Is it bad for teeth? Is it hydrating? Get the facts about fizzy water here.

For kids who don’t love plain water and parents who aren’t fans of soda, sparkling water can feel like a good compromise. 

But if you’ve wondered whether it’s okay for them to drink, I’ve got answers for you!

What is Sparkling Water?

Sparkling water is water that’s carbonated, which means it has carbon dioxide gas added to give it fizz and a slightly tangy taste. Sparkling water can be plain or lightly flavored (like LaCroix) but typically has no sugar. 

There are other kinds of fizzy water too, like:   

  • Sparkling mineral water: Water from an underground source, like a spring, that naturally contains minerals such as magnesium and calcium (example: Perrier)
  • Club soda: Carbonated water with minerals like sodium bicarbonate added to it, slightly salty tasting
  • Tonic water: Carbonated water with added quinine (a bitter compound that comes from the bark of a tree) and typically sweetened to balance the bitterness
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Is Sparkling Water Healthy?

Sparkling water that’s either plain or unsweetened is a better choice than soda, fruit punches, and other super-sweetened drinks because sugary drinks are the number-one source of added sugar for kids. What are healthy drinks for kids? Find out!

Is Sparkling Water Hydrating?

Yes. Sparkling water is 100 percent water, and according to researchers, it’s just as hydrating as plain water is.

Is Sparkling Water Bad For Teeth?

Maybe. What kids drink has a big impact on their teeth. Beverages like soda, fruit juice, and sports drinks are actually the leading cause of tooth decay in kids and teens, according to the American Dental Association. Over time, those drinks can erode tooth enamel, the protective covering on teeth that blocks decay.

Drinks that have a pH less than 4 are considered to be potentially damaging to teeth, according to researchFlavored sparkling waters have a low pH between 2.74-3.34, according to researchers from the University of Birmingham School of Dentistry, who tested a sampling of flavored sparkling waters on the market. 

In comparison, here’s the pH of some other common drinks:

Beverage pH
Plain water 7
Milk 6.6-6.8
Perrier Mineral Water 5.3 
Canada Dry Club Soda 5.2
Black Tea 4.9
Minute Maid 100% Orange Juice 3.82
Tropicana 100% Apple Juice 3.5
Gatorade Lemon-Lime 2.97
Coca-Cola 2.5

Sources: Center for Science in the Public Interest and “The pH of beverages in the United States”

The researchers say sparkling water drinks have a potential to erode tooth enamel and should be considered “acidic fruit drinks” instead of merely “flavored water”. 

Why are they so acidic? Carbonation itself lowers the pH of the water. But other ingredients are added that can lower it even more, especially citric acid, which is used to as a flavoring and preservative.

Citric acid may be listed as its own ingredient on labels or as “natural flavors”. (Wondering what “natural flavor” even means? Read: What are Natural Flavors? Get The Facts!)

This isn’t a big deal if your kids only have these occasionally–and certainly doesn’t mean you should stop serving them- but it’s good to know if your kids (or you!) drink these beverages regularly. 

Is Sparkling Water Bad For Bones?

No. Carbonated beverages have been blamed for being harmful to bones by triggering the body to excrete calcium in the urine. But according to research, this is only an issue with caffeinated beverages–and even still, probably not in a meaningful way. 

What About Regular (Flat) Flavored Water?

It’s okay, but you should read labels closely. There are a lot of choices, and the ingredients vary. 

Some (like Dasani flavored water) contain artificial sweeteners like Sucralose. Others (like Rethink water) have “natural” sweeteners like monk fruit. And some contain sugar, like Capri Sun Roarin Water, which has two teaspoons of added sugar per pouch.

You can also buy drops that you add to water for flavors. Read these labels closely too. Some contain synthetic dyes and certain varieties have caffeine.

What Should You Do?

Read the ingredients. Don’t assume that all flavored waters are simply water with a squeeze of natural fruit. Ingredients vary widely and might include sugar or artificial sweeteners.

Don’t let kids sip them throughout the day. Ideally, serve sparkling water with food to balance out some of the acidity. And discourage kids from swishing them around in their mouth–using a (ideally, reusable) straw can help prevent that. 

Keep serving regular plain water, especially when kids are parched from playing sports or being in the heat, so they learn to associate it with quenching their thirst.

The post Is Sparkling Water Good For Kids? Get The Facts! appeared first on Real Mom Nutrition.


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