High-quality child care produces a stimulating, secure and loving atmosphere for the little one.

Focusing on children's wellbeing and ecological exposures in child care centers is Essential for several reasons: Since they display exploratory behaviors that put them in direct contact with contaminated surfaces, they're more likely to be vulnerable to some contaminants found. They're also less developed immunologically, physiologically, and neurologically and are more prone to the negative effects of toxins and chemicals. Children spend a whole lot of time in child care settings. Many babies and young children spend as many as 50 hours each week, in child care.

Nationally, 13 million children, or 65 percent of U.S. kids, spend some part of the afternoon in child care and at California alone, roughly 1.1 million children five decades or younger attend child care. In this exact same condition, many adults might also be subjected as roughly 146,000 employees work 40 hours or more a week child care centers. Child care environments include substances which may be harmful for kids. Recent studies suggest that lots of child care environments might contain pesticides, allergens, volatile organic compounds from cleaning agents and sanitizers, and other contaminants which may be toxic to children's wellbeing.

Nevertheless, little is understood about what environmental and chemical exposures they might be getting in these configurations. To fill this gap, we quantified. Outcomes of the study were reported on the California Air Resources Board. Our findings help inform policies to lower accidents to children, encourage training and workshops to educate child care providers about methods to lower children's environmental exposures (ex. Using integrated pest management to decrease pesticide usage ), and search for future research.

Washing Your Baby’s Clothes
Washing Your Baby’s Clothes
Washing Your Baby’s Clothes – How to do it Rightly
Washing Dishes
Washing Dishes
Cleaning up after oneself is an important life skill
Make a Bed
Make a Bed
It might be a dying art, but learning how to make a bed is a valuable skill.
Sweep a Floor
Sweep a Floor
Give a kid a broom, and you are likely to see dirt flipping everywhere except in a pile.
Mop a Floor
Mop a Floor
Be sure to give them instructions on how to mop different floor types you may have in your home.

Transitioning back into care: Covid-19 and your illness policy

This article is part of a series on transitioning children, families, and staff back into care after Covid-19 closures. States are beginning to reopen after major closures due to Covid-19. There is variance in  approach, but one consistent piece is applicable across all states, regions, and communities – regardless of location, many children will be […]

The post Transitioning back into care: Covid-19 and your illness policy appeared first on Wonderschool Resources Hub.


This article is part of a series on transitioning children, families, and staff back into care after Covid-19 closures. States are beginning to reopen after major closures due to Covid-19. There is variance in  approach, but one consistent piece is applicable across all states, regions, and communities – regardless of location, many children will be […]

The post Transitioning back into care: Covid-19 and your illness policy appeared first on Wonderschool Resources Hub.

This article is part of a series on transitioning children, families, and staff back into care after Covid-19 closures.

States are beginning to reopen after major closures due to Covid-19. There is variance in  approach, but one consistent piece is applicable across all states, regions, and communities – regardless of location, many children will be returning to care over the next several months, and it may take some time and some thoughtfulness to help ensure a smooth transition back.

You may want to update your illness policy to be more stringent during this time. Make sure to share any changes you make with parents prior to them returning to care so expectations are clear for everyone.

Recommendations:

  • Temperature check for all children and staff upon arrival
  • Children with any symptoms of illness should not attend child care at this time. Even mild illness symptoms such as a runny nose are cause for exclusion for the time being

We also recommend that you approach this as a partnership with parents, and communicate that you’re all working together to ensure everyone’s continued health

Don’t be surprised, and don’t take it personally, if parents seem stressed about having to miss work due to a child displaying a mild illness. They’ve likely just returned to work after a very hard time trying to work + care for their child, and are going to feel extra worried about missing more time. Empathize with them and reassure them that staying home now will prevent future or further illness, and let them know you’re helping all families follow the same standards at this time

Pro Tip! Start your messaging about an updated illness policy:

Dear Parents,

As you know, Covid-19 has created mass disruption around the world for the last several months. To keep the children, our staff, and all of our families safe and healthy now and into the future, we are amending our existing illness policy to include the following new stipulations. This policy is effective immediately, and will remain in place until you are informed in writing of any new updates.

  • All children and staff will have their temperature taken upon arrival at our program every day
  • Children showing any symptoms of illness need to be excluded from the program until they have been symptom-free for a full 24 hours without the use of medication
  • All respiratory symptoms including runny nose and cough
  • Sore throat
  • Headache
  • Any temperature over 99.5F 
  • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea
  • Skin rash or blisters
  • Eye discharge or excessive redness (common symptoms of conjunctivitis) 
  • Depending on the symptoms, we may require a doctor’s note in order for your child to return to the program
  • These policies also apply to all staff members of our program

Hand Washing – Directors, teachers, children, and parents must wash hands frequently. Washing hands often and thoroughly with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds is the best method to avoid contracting the virus. If soap and water are not available, programs use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with 60-95% alcohol.

When to wash hands:

  • upon arrival to your childcare program and when you get home
  • after all diapering and bathroom use, after wiping noses, after any contact with bodily fluids of any kind
  • prior to eating, after coming in from outside, after art projects, etc.

Personal hygiene – Children, parents, teachers and directors are asked to cough into their elbows or a tissue and then wash hands immediately. Coughing into your hands puts germs on your hands, which spread very easily). Children are directed to keep hands out of the eyes, nose, mouth – the most common point of entry for germs.

We thank you for your understanding and your partnership as we all work together to ensure the best health possible for all of us.

Thinking through these pieces will give parents a great deal of assurance that you’re working hard on a smooth reopening process, and the more confident parents feel, the more relaxed their children will also feel. Keep us posted on how things are going, and remember to reach out any time for the support of the Wonderschool Community.

Want to read more from this series? Click here to access additional articles on transitioning children and parents back into care.

The post Transitioning back into care: Covid-19 and your illness policy appeared first on Wonderschool Resources Hub.


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