High-quality child care produces a stimulating, secure and loving atmosphere for the little one.

Focusing on children's wellbeing and ecological exposures in child care centers is Essential for several reasons: Since they display exploratory behaviors that put them in direct contact with contaminated surfaces, they're more likely to be vulnerable to some contaminants found. They're also less developed immunologically, physiologically, and neurologically and are more prone to the negative effects of toxins and chemicals. Children spend a whole lot of time in child care settings. Many babies and young children spend as many as 50 hours each week, in child care.

Nationally, 13 million children, or 65 percent of U.S. kids, spend some part of the afternoon in child care and at California alone, roughly 1.1 million children five decades or younger attend child care. In this exact same condition, many adults might also be subjected as roughly 146,000 employees work 40 hours or more a week child care centers. Child care environments include substances which may be harmful for kids. Recent studies suggest that lots of child care environments might contain pesticides, allergens, volatile organic compounds from cleaning agents and sanitizers, and other contaminants which may be toxic to children's wellbeing.

Nevertheless, little is understood about what environmental and chemical exposures they might be getting in these configurations. To fill this gap, we quantified. Outcomes of the study were reported on the California Air Resources Board. Our findings help inform policies to lower accidents to children, encourage training and workshops to educate child care providers about methods to lower children's environmental exposures (ex. Using integrated pest management to decrease pesticide usage ), and search for future research.

Washing Your Baby’s Clothes
Washing Your Baby’s Clothes
Washing Your Baby’s Clothes – How to do it Rightly
Washing Dishes
Washing Dishes
Cleaning up after oneself is an important life skill
Make a Bed
Make a Bed
It might be a dying art, but learning how to make a bed is a valuable skill.
Sweep a Floor
Sweep a Floor
Give a kid a broom, and you are likely to see dirt flipping everywhere except in a pile.
Mop a Floor
Mop a Floor
Be sure to give them instructions on how to mop different floor types you may have in your home.

The Importance of Social-Emotional Learning in Early Childhood

Dr. Lorea Martinez, Author, Social Emotional Learning Consultant, Researcher and author of Teaching with the HEART in Mind discusses with HiMama the importance of not only recognizing but attuning to...

The post The Importance of Social-Emotional Learning in Early Childhood appeared first on HiMama Blog - Resources for Daycare Centers.


Dr. Lorea Martinez, Author, Social Emotional Learning Consultant, Researcher and author of Teaching with the HEART in Mind discusses with HiMama the importance of not only recognizing but attuning to...

The post The Importance of Social-Emotional Learning in Early Childhood appeared first on HiMama Blog - Resources for Daycare Centers.

Dr. Lorea Martinez, Author, Social Emotional Learning Consultant, Researcher and author of Teaching with the HEART in Mind discusses with HiMama the importance of not only recognizing but attuning to emotions of young children during early childhood.

Lorea gives 5 tangible tips for educators who are looking to bring Social-Emotional Learning (SEL) into the classroom through the HEART method that Dr. Martinez created. In doing so, educators can recognize and redesign their curriculum and personal teaching philosophy in order to help children develop their social-emotional skills.

Through the HEART method (outlined below), educators can help children:

H- Honor their emotions. Name, interpret and identify your emotions. Many children start to learn about their emotions very young and often in the classroom. It’s important to talk about emotions in the classroom to help children identify and understand that it’s ok to have all of these emotions whether good or bad and to help regulate them.

E- Elect their responses. This is a time to create space that allows individuals to make a positive decision and to choose their behavior. Children may learn to “take a deep breath” or “take a break” during the times they have “big” feelings in order to help them not react but rather observe the feelings and calm themselves down before reacting.

A- Apply empathy. This aspect is a very important part in early childhood. For young children to be able to see the emotions in other children and being able to talk to other children about their emotions and feelings is super important as this is carried on through out adulthood.

R- Reignite their relationships. This aspect is all about establishing and maintaining positive relationships with others over time. The early childhood setting is a great place for young children to practice this.

T- Transform with purpose. This part of the HEART acronym looks at how individuals can be helpers…not just consumers. How can we help our families, communities and environments to be better by using our strengths and assets.

Dr. Martinez explains that SEL (social-emotional learning) is often seen as something separate from teaching. She encourages rather see SEL as part of teaching in order to see progress in young children. In order for educators to see the SEL skills in their children, they also need to practice these skills themselves. Adults should also have a toolbox of ways to deal with big emotions in a productive and caring way as well as show empathy for others- we need to practice these skills in an effective way so we can teach these things to children.

If we are nurturing children’s natural curiosity that children have to learn and know new things, we are more effective educators.

Dr. Lorea Martinez

Lorea recommends 3 key strategies to help educators bring SEL into the classroom:

  1. Explicit Instruction– When students are coming together during circle time and you’re doing morning greetings, this is a great opportunity to bring explicit lessons about social- emotional skills. For example, checking in with the students and asking “how do you feel today?” By sharing feelings, this increases their vocabulary for students and also helps them understand and recognize their feelings and others around them.
  2. Integrate with our Teaching Practices– As an educator, consider your routines and classroom set up and think about the spaces you provide to students for them to practice social-emotional skills. Consider the structure of your classroom and philosophy to ensure it’s helping rather than hindering children’s abilities to regulate and explore all of their emotions.
  3. Connection with Academic Content- Reflect on the moments children are identifying letters, words and numbers, this is a great chance to bring in the SEL component and discuss things that may be more interesting and less interesting to the children. For example, typically children may be very excited about science and experiments, so being explicit about the emotions present during these times as well as during more mundane subjects like math and counting. Emotions have a huge range and helping children identify how they feel during certain tasks and learning opportunities is key.

Dr. Martinez suggests that at the end of the day, taking inventory on your current teaching practices and considering the opportunities you give your children to recognize, reflect and connect with themselves and others around their emotions wether good or bad, big or small is a great starting point in implementing social-emotional learning into your classroom.

Want to connect with Dr. Lorea Martinez and learn more about TEaching with the HEART in Mind or purchase her book? You can do so through her website, Facebook, or Twitter!

The post The Importance of Social-Emotional Learning in Early Childhood appeared first on HiMama Blog - Resources for Daycare Centers.


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