High-quality child care produces a stimulating, secure and loving atmosphere for the little one.

Focusing on children's wellbeing and ecological exposures in child care centers is Essential for several reasons: Since they display exploratory behaviors that put them in direct contact with contaminated surfaces, they're more likely to be vulnerable to some contaminants found. They're also less developed immunologically, physiologically, and neurologically and are more prone to the negative effects of toxins and chemicals. Children spend a whole lot of time in child care settings. Many babies and young children spend as many as 50 hours each week, in child care.

Nationally, 13 million children, or 65 percent of U.S. kids, spend some part of the afternoon in child care and at California alone, roughly 1.1 million children five decades or younger attend child care. In this exact same condition, many adults might also be subjected as roughly 146,000 employees work 40 hours or more a week child care centers. Child care environments include substances which may be harmful for kids. Recent studies suggest that lots of child care environments might contain pesticides, allergens, volatile organic compounds from cleaning agents and sanitizers, and other contaminants which may be toxic to children's wellbeing.

Nevertheless, little is understood about what environmental and chemical exposures they might be getting in these configurations. To fill this gap, we quantified. Outcomes of the study were reported on the California Air Resources Board. Our findings help inform policies to lower accidents to children, encourage training and workshops to educate child care providers about methods to lower children's environmental exposures (ex. Using integrated pest management to decrease pesticide usage ), and search for future research.

Washing Your Baby’s Clothes
Washing Your Baby’s Clothes
Washing Your Baby’s Clothes – How to do it Rightly
Washing Dishes
Washing Dishes
Cleaning up after oneself is an important life skill
Make a Bed
Make a Bed
It might be a dying art, but learning how to make a bed is a valuable skill.
Sweep a Floor
Sweep a Floor
Give a kid a broom, and you are likely to see dirt flipping everywhere except in a pile.
Mop a Floor
Mop a Floor
Be sure to give them instructions on how to mop different floor types you may have in your home.

Nova Scotia Changes and Amendments to Day Care Act and Regulations

Childcare regulation is always evolving to meet new rules and needs, and Nova Scotia has been no exception. Starting October 2020, new regulations have kicked in for centres in Nova...

The post Nova Scotia Changes and Amendments to Day Care Act and Regulations appeared first on HiMama Blog - Resources for Daycare Centers.


Childcare regulation is always evolving to meet new rules and needs, and Nova Scotia has been no exception. Starting October 2020, new regulations have kicked in for centres in Nova...

The post Nova Scotia Changes and Amendments to Day Care Act and Regulations appeared first on HiMama Blog - Resources for Daycare Centers.

Childcare regulation is always evolving to meet new rules and needs, and Nova Scotia has been no exception. Starting October 2020, new regulations have kicked in for centres in Nova Scotia via the Early Learning and Child Care Act – the successor to the Day Care Act. This long-awaited update gives childcare centers across Nova Scotia a clearer picture of what they are responsible for. Thankfully, it also gives a roadmap for how Nova Scotia centres can make their lives easier by moving more documentation to digital!

Many centres in Nova Scotia are already using HiMama to help run their centres, manage attendance and billing, communicate with families, and collect the ongoing paperwork for each day. With the new regulatory changes in Nova Scotia, centers are looking at going digital to make everything more accessible to families and continue to focus on the children, not the paperwork. Centers can look to use their provincial framework within HiMama, communicate with families, track attendance, send daily reports, and share all the special moments. 

🤷 Why were these changes made? 

  • It’s about time! The Act had not been updated since 1989
  • Allows for updated use of language and current practices used in the field 
  • Expansion of officials for family home child cares 
  • Clearer definitions and directions for licensees

📝What are the changes? 

  • Clearer rules around family communications plans and how to facilitate this
  • Modernized language around childcare 
  • Aligning new requirements for home child-care and expanding legislative authority 
  • Establishing new staff-to-children ratios for mixed ages
  • Streamlining requirements for licenses

🤿Let’s dive a little deeper into these changes and what they mean for you. 

  1. Requirements around family communications plans and how to notify families of daily activity. Family Communication plans are now mandatory in Nova Scotia centres. These family communication plans capture the day-to-day routine of centres, and should include a daily record of attendance, date of withdrawal from the program, daily reports for infants and toddlers, and a parent handbook. The handbook will assist parents in making a decision about the care of their children and includes any communications plan required by the minister.

    Side note – a great way to make family communications easy and simple for staff and families is to manage all of this via a childcare app (like HiMama!). If you’re interested in seeing how other Nova Scotia childcare centres use HiMama, we’d love to chat! 
  1. Clearer requirements for learning and development for school-age children. Centres now have more direction on how to build out a robust development program for school-age children. This means centres should be planning developmentally appropriate periods of outdoor activity, except during extreme weather conditions. 
  1. Ratios for classrooms have been formalized in the new regulations.  Make sure you are up to date with the set ratios for your classrooms and centre, and don’t forget to check the indoor play space requirements as set out by the Ministry! 

There are many other important changes within the Act, particularly around Agency relationships and responsibilities, but we wanted to highlight the most actionable ones for centre directors and owners to be aware of, and take action on.

If you need to establish a family communications plan or would like to move yours to a digital format (especially during COVID when parents are restricted from entering many centres), we’d love to help!

Centres all across Nova Scotia are already using HiMama to improve the quality of their program by going digital, freeing their staff to focus on the children and not the paperwork. Centres can look to use their provincial framework within HiMama, communicate with families, track attendance, and share all those special moments. 

Book a free 15-minute consultation with HiMama today to learn more about these regulatory changes and how you can benefit. We’re SO excited to chat with you!

The post Nova Scotia Changes and Amendments to Day Care Act and Regulations appeared first on HiMama Blog - Resources for Daycare Centers.


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