High-quality child care produces a stimulating, secure and loving atmosphere for the little one.

Focusing on children's wellbeing and ecological exposures in child care centers is Essential for several reasons: Since they display exploratory behaviors that put them in direct contact with contaminated surfaces, they're more likely to be vulnerable to some contaminants found. They're also less developed immunologically, physiologically, and neurologically and are more prone to the negative effects of toxins and chemicals. Children spend a whole lot of time in child care settings. Many babies and young children spend as many as 50 hours each week, in child care.

Nationally, 13 million children, or 65 percent of U.S. kids, spend some part of the afternoon in child care and at California alone, roughly 1.1 million children five decades or younger attend child care. In this exact same condition, many adults might also be subjected as roughly 146,000 employees work 40 hours or more a week child care centers. Child care environments include substances which may be harmful for kids. Recent studies suggest that lots of child care environments might contain pesticides, allergens, volatile organic compounds from cleaning agents and sanitizers, and other contaminants which may be toxic to children's wellbeing.

Nevertheless, little is understood about what environmental and chemical exposures they might be getting in these configurations. To fill this gap, we quantified. Outcomes of the study were reported on the California Air Resources Board. Our findings help inform policies to lower accidents to children, encourage training and workshops to educate child care providers about methods to lower children's environmental exposures (ex. Using integrated pest management to decrease pesticide usage ), and search for future research.

Washing Your Baby’s Clothes
Washing Your Baby’s Clothes
Washing Your Baby’s Clothes – How to do it Rightly
Washing Dishes
Washing Dishes
Cleaning up after oneself is an important life skill
Make a Bed
Make a Bed
It might be a dying art, but learning how to make a bed is a valuable skill.
Sweep a Floor
Sweep a Floor
Give a kid a broom, and you are likely to see dirt flipping everywhere except in a pile.
Mop a Floor
Mop a Floor
Be sure to give them instructions on how to mop different floor types you may have in your home.

Social Skills for Play and Learning [Webinar]

In this webinar, we were joined by Jan Blaxall and Janet Foster. Both are early years expects with Tools for life. Jan and Janet went through the importance of social...

The post Social Skills for Play and Learning [Webinar] appeared first on HiMama Blog - Resources for Daycare Centers.


In this webinar, we were joined by Jan Blaxall and Janet Foster. Both are early years expects with Tools for life. Jan and Janet went through the importance of social...

The post Social Skills for Play and Learning [Webinar] appeared first on HiMama Blog - Resources for Daycare Centers.

In this webinar, we were joined by Jan Blaxall and Janet Foster. Both are early years expects with Tools for life. Jan and Janet went through the importance of social skills and the importance of it for children during play, how educators play such a key role and how they can support children through tips on entering play, modeling, and co-regulating with children as they learn and grow.

🎤 Our Special Guests

Jan Blaxall, MASc, RECE
Janet Foster, BA, RECE

Jan and Janet are life-long Early Childhood Educators who are committed to promoting emotional and social development as the foundation of well-being, relationships, and learning. For the past two decades, they have researched and taught the milestones and challenges of social-emotional development and the importance of relationship-based approaches to building security, self and other awareness, and social skills that are key developmental tasks in the first 5 years of life. Janet is currently the Coordinator and professor of the Early Childhood Education Program at Fanshawe College in Ontario. Jan was also an ECE professor at Fanshawe College prior to her retirement. Both are actively involved as providers of professional learning and mentoring to ECEs and other professionals working with young children.

🧪 Key Learning Outcomes

  • Social Competence is a complex interaction for children and they need to have the tools and skills to interact effectively
  • Social competence matters for many reasons. In the short term, it helps children enter play and set foundations for building friendships. In the long term, it is that relationship building and learning.
  • We know and understand that toddlers are high energy players. They are full-body learners and their play sessions are typically short-lived. As educators, we have to support them with sustaining their play.
  • For children who are a little older, social play depends on their self-regulation and a child’s awareness of others.
  • For children who are self-aware and working towards self-regulation, they can enter play easier than children who aren’t.
  • Children have 3 skills needed for play in a group: Entering, maintaining play, and problem-solving.
  • A child may have different barriers that makes entering play difficult. This can be language, cognitive development, temperament style, or limited self-regulation
  • Educators need to remember that not all children have the same experiences or opportunities. This can be a lack of emotional security, experience with materials or with play in group settings, and opportunities.
  • Dr. Stuart Shanker’s continuum helps us better understand the challenges children have with self-regulation and how we move up and down in the arousal continuum throughout the day.
  • Educators are children’s co-regulators for self-regulation
  • Educators are there to help model for a child, to plan opportunities where social skills are needed, and to link them up with peers that will help them build their social skills.

✨Feedback

We want to hear from you! Fill out our survey to help us improve your webinar experience and don’t forget to follow us on Social media 

Join our community on Instagram and Facebook

🖥 Watch Recording

Watch the recording here. Access slides here. You can find your certificate here. You can download the PDF, fill out your name, and center name in the blanks and you’re done!

📆 What’s Next on HiMama Helps?

Space is limited and you don’t miss out on our next webinar, register today to reserve your spot!


Running a Child Care Centre is Hard…

We’d love to make it a little much easier! Did you know that parents are increasingly evaluating childcare centers on whether they offer digital parental communication, photo and video updates, and contactless check-in and billing? The HiMama child care app helps to streamline your digital parent communications, join the family today and get a quote!

The post Social Skills for Play and Learning [Webinar] appeared first on HiMama Blog - Resources for Daycare Centers.


Read full article on blog 2


Mamavation | Healthy Living | Lifestyle | Detoxify Home | Product Recommendations

Feed not found.

UrbanSitter Childcare Blog | Resources for Parents, Babysitters, and Nannies

Feed not found.

Pregnancy | Parenthood